Arthur C. Pillsbury Foundation

Protecting and Preserving All Life -- By Extending Human Vision

Arthur C. Pillsbury had a lot of different Studios
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A Pillsbury Studio was once at:
219 Powell Street
San Francisco, California





A Pillsbury Studio was
once at:
501 Geary Street
San Francisco, California
Home Office





A Pillsbury Studio was
once at:
345 East Colorado Street
Pasadena, California


The Pillsbury Studio
Studio of the Three Arrows
Old Village, Yosemite Valley, California
1906 - 1924

The Studio was located in front of and toward the Sentinel Bridge on the corner of a road since eliminated.

The Pillsbury Studio in New Village, also called the Studio of the Three Arrows
1924

Interior of the Pillsbury Studio in New Village.  The stairs lead to the movie theater which seated 375.
1924

The Pillsbury Studio
Studio of the Three Arrows
New Village, Yosemite Valley
1924 - 1927

The Studio was located on the footprint now occupied by the Visitor's Center, about 100 paces from what was then the Best Studio, now the Ansel Adams Gallery.

The Pillsbury Studio was welcoming, providing postcards for purchase, places to sit quietly and write a note to friends and loved ones at home.  There, you could buy stamps and leave your finished card or letter to be mailed for you.   Arthur C. Pillsbury wanted each person who visited Yosemite to pause in the beauty of nature, narrowing the divide between us and the myriad forms life takes on Earth and to understand nature as another part of a greater whole of which we are also a part.

He designed and produced products which made it possible for everyone to take with them something they could afford which would remind them of the beauty and that the living evidence of nature exalts us.  There was something for everyone in the Studio.

He believed if you love the natural world you will be inspired to preserve it.  Over the years from 1916 until 1924 he used his mass production photo post cards machine so he could save enough to develop the microscopic motion picture movie camera.  He wanted you to see and understand all of the nature existing around you. 

It worked.  Using the Pillsbury Flower Specimen cards people found the different varieties, and began to ask for more understanding.

This was the first Nature Center.